Tumblrdolt

Dolt you know already? Off-center fellow in RVA. You can always email me at thunderdolt at the gmail. Or KiK me: ThunderDolt

Dec 1
atsirhc:

So, my $9.99 sleep meds were $.50 today because Medicaid. Yay!

It is a yay they’re finally doing right by you!
This is why we need the single-payer coverage system. Christa shouldn’t have ever been paying the $9.99 for this med in the first place. Partly because she can’t afford it, living with a disabling condition, but because those drugs aren’t really worth $9.99. If you have insurance, even though the pharmacy puts “Your insurance saved you $9.49”, that doesn’t mean your insurance paid $9.49. Your insurance has a contract of acceptable costs, and chances are if you look at your benefits statement when it arrives, the insurance company has negotiated a payment of closer to $4.00 for that med, and medicaid and medicare are likely paying less that $2. So, your insurance saved YOU that amount, but it didn’t pay that amount. If you’re uninsured, you aren’t entitled to that discount in any way, shape, or form.
Walgreens does have a discount program that I use which is $25 per year, and it saves me 20%+ on prescriptions. It pays for itself in just a few prescriptions. It’s not their way of being nice to me: It’s their way of ensuring I do business with them. But you know what? They DON’T do $4/mo $10/3mo generics like the grocery stores do. For one of my prescriptions, even with the discount card, it costs $8.32/mo, so I split my prescriptions between 2 places.
Seriously , look at your benefit explanation statements sometime. If you have a surgery, you’ll see $40,000 reduced to “allowable amount under insurance $3,800”. In order to do business with the various insurance companies, the healthcare providers negotiate acceptable amounts for various services. In order to make up for those hard-fought contracts, the healthcare provider, be it doctor, hospital, pharmacy, etc. charges uninsured patients with higher amounts than they accept from even the most generous-spending companies. It’s just business.
It’s why the current healthcare reform is not enough. So many other countries have figured it out; even VERY capitalistic-economy countries. It’s not Socialism. It’s better money management. Because, as I’ve stated before, those of us without insurance are the most likely to not seek medical attention until it’s become an expensive-to-treat condition. And those without insurance are most likely to not be able to afford those non-discounted charges. Eventually those unpaid charges are written-off. That forfeited money can’t just be ignored by the healthcare providers: They have to recoup it to pay their employees/providers that were there for the treatment somehow. So they raise their fees again, including their negotiated contracts with insurance, and everyone with insurance ends up covering all this written-off unnecessarily-expensive healthcare.
It’s awesome that we can get this covered for people who qualify. However, we need to take care of everyone. But yeah, I’m glad that people like Christa don’t have to choose between food or medicine. A friend of mine’s mom can’t afford her life-sustaining meds any more. All of her retirement money has been spent on it.
*Sorry for hijacking your joyous post. It just makes me mad that it took so long for you to get the relief to which you should simply be entitled.

atsirhc:

So, my $9.99 sleep meds were $.50 today because Medicaid. Yay!

It is a yay they’re finally doing right by you!

This is why we need the single-payer coverage system. Christa shouldn’t have ever been paying the $9.99 for this med in the first place. Partly because she can’t afford it, living with a disabling condition, but because those drugs aren’t really worth $9.99. If you have insurance, even though the pharmacy puts “Your insurance saved you $9.49”, that doesn’t mean your insurance paid $9.49. Your insurance has a contract of acceptable costs, and chances are if you look at your benefits statement when it arrives, the insurance company has negotiated a payment of closer to $4.00 for that med, and medicaid and medicare are likely paying less that $2. So, your insurance saved YOU that amount, but it didn’t pay that amount. If you’re uninsured, you aren’t entitled to that discount in any way, shape, or form.

Walgreens does have a discount program that I use which is $25 per year, and it saves me 20%+ on prescriptions. It pays for itself in just a few prescriptions. It’s not their way of being nice to me: It’s their way of ensuring I do business with them. But you know what? They DON’T do $4/mo $10/3mo generics like the grocery stores do. For one of my prescriptions, even with the discount card, it costs $8.32/mo, so I split my prescriptions between 2 places.

Seriously , look at your benefit explanation statements sometime. If you have a surgery, you’ll see $40,000 reduced to “allowable amount under insurance $3,800”. In order to do business with the various insurance companies, the healthcare providers negotiate acceptable amounts for various services. In order to make up for those hard-fought contracts, the healthcare provider, be it doctor, hospital, pharmacy, etc. charges uninsured patients with higher amounts than they accept from even the most generous-spending companies. It’s just business.

It’s why the current healthcare reform is not enough. So many other countries have figured it out; even VERY capitalistic-economy countries. It’s not Socialism. It’s better money management. Because, as I’ve stated before, those of us without insurance are the most likely to not seek medical attention until it’s become an expensive-to-treat condition. And those without insurance are most likely to not be able to afford those non-discounted charges. Eventually those unpaid charges are written-off. That forfeited money can’t just be ignored by the healthcare providers: They have to recoup it to pay their employees/providers that were there for the treatment somehow. So they raise their fees again, including their negotiated contracts with insurance, and everyone with insurance ends up covering all this written-off unnecessarily-expensive healthcare.

It’s awesome that we can get this covered for people who qualify. However, we need to take care of everyone. But yeah, I’m glad that people like Christa don’t have to choose between food or medicine. A friend of mine’s mom can’t afford her life-sustaining meds any more. All of her retirement money has been spent on it.

*Sorry for hijacking your joyous post. It just makes me mad that it took so long for you to get the relief to which you should simply be entitled.


  1. thunderdolt reblogged this from christa-dammit and added:
    It is a yay they’re finally doing right by you! This is why we need the single-payer coverage system. Christa shouldn’t...
  2. christa-dammit posted this