Tumblrdolt

Aug 6

So, you know when you’re making nachos, and the cheese is nice and melted on the chips, so you reach in the fridge and grab the jar of salsa? Well, I recommend that you keep your open salsa and open pasta sauce on different shelves.

Right after I poured the sauce on the chips, I looked at it and thought, “that salsa doesn’t look like it did the other night. What gives? Oh. Shit. Did I throw it out? Hell no! All that delicious cheese and chicken was on there! A little hot sauce made it okay.

Italian nachos, anyone?!

So, you know when you’re making nachos, and the cheese is nice and melted on the chips, so you reach in the fridge and grab the jar of salsa? Well, I recommend that you keep your open salsa and open pasta sauce on different shelves.

Right after I poured the sauce on the chips, I looked at it and thought, “that salsa doesn’t look like it did the other night. What gives? Oh. Shit. Did I throw it out? Hell no! All that delicious cheese and chicken was on there! A little hot sauce made it okay.

Italian nachos, anyone?!


Tumblricity always makes me happy.

Tumblricity always makes me happy.


Aug 5

I’m trying to prove a point that there is a fan base for a solo Black Widow movie. Please reblog if you’d watch it.

cirquedurartastic:

I’d watch it twice.


Aug 4

I fear

The decision to eat the leftover broiled eel at 4:45 AM may turn out to have been a bad one.

I didn’t have enough rice vinegar to make good sticky rice, so no sushi rolls. Just Unagi.


Aug 2
Yup, it’s pretty dang excitin’ round here when 2 youngsters wind up makin their way to the big city! Good luck, y’all, and god bless…

Yup, it’s pretty dang excitin’ round here when 2 youngsters wind up makin their way to the big city! Good luck, y’all, and god bless…



Aug 1

RVA Query:
Has anyone been to the Bowtie’s screenings of Rocky Horror? Share impressions?

A friend’s daughter is a fan of the movie, but has never been to a live screening.


Jul 30
Best thing to do when you bought fish for sushi and have left over: broil that stuff, coat with pineapple coconut mango tequila sauce, and pair with sautéed brussels sprouts and broccoli cheddar rice.

Best thing to do when you bought fish for sushi and have left over: broil that stuff, coat with pineapple coconut mango tequila sauce, and pair with sautéed brussels sprouts and broccoli cheddar rice.



Anonymous said: Hey Jeff, do you have an uncesored blog/tumbler for those of us who enjoy your view of the world and the kind of dad you are.

Well, thanks. Nope. No other tumblr. This is me, uncensored. Well, mostly. There are things about which I’ll just not discuss.

I contemplated the idea: Activating another tumblr would give me the kind of freedom where I could say anything at all, I suppose. Things which ought not really be published. Then I considered that maybe if I needed to hide those things, then for me, they’re not worth sharing. Besides, I’ve curated my list of mutual follows. I’ll follow anyone else’s second, third, fourth blog, but I think I’m just gonna keep this real. Keep it me. Then there’d be the whole contacting people to invite them to follow the new blog deal. Frankly, it’s just too much work.

Did I mention I love you assholes?!


Jul 27
redcloud:


A Disappearing Island Restored
Not so long ago, many islands rose above the brackish waters of the Chesapeake Bay. These small islands offered a predator-free haven for nesting water birds and turtles, while the larger islands supported fishing communities along with wildlife. But now, the muddy, marshy islands are eroding under the combined forces of geology and climate change. The very crust under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking, while sea levels are rising. Made of clay and silt, the islands erode quickly, and many have disappeared altogether.
Poplar Island ranks among those that would have been gone a decade ago if not for a massive restoration project. In the 1800s, the island had an area just over 1,000 acres and held a small town of about 100 people. By the 1990s, the island was nearly gone, containing a mere 10 acres of land. In the left image, taken by the Landsat 5 satellite on June 28, 1997, Poplar Island had been reduced to a tiny green dot surrounded by clouds of silt-laden water.
In 1998, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers began to restore Poplar Island. The project serves two purposes: it restores lost habitat to birds and turtles, and it provides a use for material dredged from Baltimore Harbor and Chesapeake Bay shipping lanes. The method of restoration is visible in the center image, taken on June 21, 2006. Engineers built dikes around sections of the island and have been gradually filling in the center with dredged silt. By 2006, the island had regained the shape it held in the 1800s.
As each cell is filled with new soil, the Army Corp of Engineers plants vegetation. The right image, taken on July 5, 2011, shows that much of the island has been re-vegetated. Poplar Island now has an area of 1,140 acres and may continue to expand by another 500 acres before the restoration is completed in 2027. Upon completion, Poplar Island will be half wetlands and half uplands covered by forest. The restoration project is expected to cost $667 million, says the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers.
Islands and shorelines in the Mid-Atlantic may become increasingly vulnerable to erosion. Sea levels are rising as the ocean warms and expands—and as glaciers and ice sheets melt—but the rise isn’t uniform around the planet. Currents, salinity, and topography create areas where sea levels are increasing more quickly, and recent research found that the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coast is one of the areas of accelerated sea-level rise. The rate of increase in the densely populated Mid-Atlantic is three to four times greater than average global sea-level rise. The increased sea level will make coastal regions and islands more prone to flooding and erosion.
A short animation of the Poplar Island restoration is available from the NASA Scientific Visualization Studio.

References

Burton, K. (n.d.) The island that almost vanished is slowly reappearing. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Chesapeake Bay Field Office. Accessed June 29, 2012.
Erwin, M., Brinker, D.F., Watts, B.D., Costanzo, G.R., and Morton, D.D. (2010, September 1). Islands at bay: rising seas, eroding islands, and waterbird habitat loss in Chesapeake Bay (USA). Journal of Coastal Conservation.
Kaplan, M.D.G. (2012, June 22). Escapes: Rebuilding Maryland’s wild islands. The Washington Post Accessed June 29, 2012.
Sallenger Jr., A.H., Doran, K.S., and Howd, P.A. (2012, June 24). Hotspot of accelerated sea-level rise on the Atlantic coast of North America. Nature Climate Change.
US Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District. (2011, March 9). Poplar Island Paul S. Sarbanes Environmental Restoration Site. Accessed June 29, 2012.
NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Holli Riebeek.
Instrument(s): Landsat 5 - TM

Do you want to build an island?
(It doesn’t have to be an island…)

redcloud:

A Disappearing Island Restored

Not so long ago, many islands rose above the brackish waters of the Chesapeake Bay. These small islands offered a predator-free haven for nesting water birds and turtles, while the larger islands supported fishing communities along with wildlife. But now, the muddy, marshy islands are eroding under the combined forces of geology and climate change. The very crust under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking, while sea levels are rising. Made of clay and silt, the islands erode quickly, and many have disappeared altogether.

Poplar Island ranks among those that would have been gone a decade ago if not for a massive restoration project. In the 1800s, the island had an area just over 1,000 acres and held a small town of about 100 people. By the 1990s, the island was nearly gone, containing a mere 10 acres of land. In the left image, taken by the Landsat 5 satellite on June 28, 1997, Poplar Island had been reduced to a tiny green dot surrounded by clouds of silt-laden water.

In 1998, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers began to restore Poplar Island. The project serves two purposes: it restores lost habitat to birds and turtles, and it provides a use for material dredged from Baltimore Harbor and Chesapeake Bay shipping lanes. The method of restoration is visible in the center image, taken on June 21, 2006. Engineers built dikes around sections of the island and have been gradually filling in the center with dredged silt. By 2006, the island had regained the shape it held in the 1800s.

As each cell is filled with new soil, the Army Corp of Engineers plants vegetation. The right image, taken on July 5, 2011, shows that much of the island has been re-vegetated. Poplar Island now has an area of 1,140 acres and may continue to expand by another 500 acres before the restoration is completed in 2027. Upon completion, Poplar Island will be half wetlands and half uplands covered by forest. The restoration project is expected to cost $667 million, says the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers.

Islands and shorelines in the Mid-Atlantic may become increasingly vulnerable to erosion. Sea levels are rising as the ocean warms and expands—and as glaciers and ice sheets melt—but the rise isn’t uniform around the planet. Currents, salinity, and topography create areas where sea levels are increasing more quickly, and recent research found that the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coast is one of the areas of accelerated sea-level rise. The rate of increase in the densely populated Mid-Atlantic is three to four times greater than average global sea-level rise. The increased sea level will make coastal regions and islands more prone to flooding and erosion.

short animation of the Poplar Island restoration is available from the NASA Scientific Visualization Studio.

  1. References

  2. Burton, K. (n.d.) The island that almost vanished is slowly reappearing. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Chesapeake Bay Field Office. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  3. Erwin, M., Brinker, D.F., Watts, B.D., Costanzo, G.R., and Morton, D.D. (2010, September 1). Islands at bay: rising seas, eroding islands, and waterbird habitat loss in Chesapeake Bay (USA). Journal of Coastal Conservation.
  4. Kaplan, M.D.G. (2012, June 22). Escapes: Rebuilding Maryland’s wild islands. The Washington Post Accessed June 29, 2012.
  5. Sallenger Jr., A.H., Doran, K.S., and Howd, P.A. (2012, June 24). Hotspot of accelerated sea-level rise on the Atlantic coast of North America. Nature Climate Change.
  6. US Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District. (2011, March 9). Poplar Island Paul S. Sarbanes Environmental Restoration Site. Accessed June 29, 2012.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Holli Riebeek.

Instrument(s): Landsat 5 - TM

Do you want to build an island?

(It doesn’t have to be an island…)


Jul 26
Um… er… naughty nerds need self-love too?

Um… er… naughty nerds need self-love too?


I love this man! What would it take to be adopted into his family?!

(via readitsomeplace)